TAKASHI ARAI PHOTOGRAPHY JOURNAL TAKASHI ARAI PHOTOGRAPHY JOURNAL

July 25 – Sept 20: EXPOSED in a Hundred Suns / 百の太陽に灼かれて

EXPOSED in a Hundred Suns

My solo exhibition entitled “EXPOSED in a Hundred Suns” will be held from next weekend, June 25 until September 20 at Photo Galley International, Tokyo. Please stop by if you are around!
http://www.pgi.ac/index.php?lang=en

7月25日から、東京芝浦のフォト・ギャラリー・インターナショナルにて個展が始まります。
福島-広島-長崎に取材した新旧作の展示です。ご来場お待ちしています!

新井卓作品展「EXPOSED in a Hundred Suns」
百の太陽に灼かれて
2014年7月25日(金)−9月20日(土)
◉ 詳細はギャラリーHPにて http://www.pgi.ac

When I took my first trip to US six years ago, I picked up a photography book of nuclear tests; perhaps my own journey began at this moment. The tremendous atomic cloud photographed there, which seemed to be wriggling, dispersed its inner light in every direction.

If art is something that we cannot stop demanding to overpower us, or to transcend human knowledge and death, perhaps the new suns unveiled by thermonuclear bombs are some extreme realization of this demand—even if this is something that leaves an unremovable curse on the earth. In any case, such were my thoughts at that time.

Some years after that, I visited the National Museum of Nuclear Science & History in Albuquerque, New Mexico. In one corner of this spacious building, a film of the nuclear cloud over Hiroshima, taken by a B-29 that had followed the Enola Gay, was being shown on repeat. Seeing that dream-like, almost heavenly film, I thought of images of the destruction of Hiroshima, Nagasaki and Lucky Dragon 5: the deformed bodies painted by Iri and Toshi Maruki, Shomei Tomatsu’s photographic record of skin. Such images are related to this ominous aerial footage, in that they quite rudely bring us back down to earth. These two types of images stand impossibly far apart, separated by the gap between extreme beauty and extreme ugliness: they soar away from each other on opposite sides of this unbridgeable divide.

Now, waiting with bated breath for enigmatic signs from something gigantic, I walk through a blighted land. I hold up a small silver plate towards things that were burned—and, even today, are still being burned—by a hundred suns. My journey in search of the connection between heaven and earth continues.

– Takashi Arai

6年前、初めて旅したアメリカで核実験の写真集を手にしたときから、旅は始まっていたのかもしれない。写真にとらえられた巨大な原子雲は、自身の内なる光を四方に放射し、蠢動するかにみえた。
芸術がいまだ圧倒的なもの、人智や死を超えるなにものかを求めてやまないのだとすれば、水爆がうみだす新しい太陽たちは、そのひとつの極点ではなかったか。少なくとも私にはそう思えた。たとえそれが、永久にぬぐい去れないケガレを地上にもたらすものだとしても。

それから何年かが過ぎ、ニューメキシコ州アルバカーキの国立核科学歴史博物館を訪れた。広々とした館の一角で、エノラ・ゲイに随行したB-29がとらえたヒロシマの原子雲の映像が、くり返し投影されていた。その夢みるような天上の映像と、広島、長崎、第五福竜丸の、焼け爛れて地を這うものたちの写真──丸木位里・俊の裸体、東松照明の皮膚の記憶。善悪と美醜の辺土(リンボ)で、ふたつのイメージは果てしなく遠く、永遠にたどり着くことのできない両岸に、激しく屹立している。

いま、得体のしれない大きなものの気配に息を潜めながら、汚された土地を歩く。百の太陽に灼かれ、いまも灼かれゆくものたちに、小さな銀板をかざす。地上と天上をつなぐ糸を捜す旅は、つづく。

新井卓